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Coffee & Tea to Fruit Juices & Berries

Cleaning Tips:Coffee & Tea to Fruit Juices & Berries

Coffee & Tea
Remove fresh stains from cotton and linen materials by first rinsing in warm water then pouring boiling water from a height of 2 – 3 feet onto the stain. Follow by washing in soapy water. If a trace remains, bleach in the sun, or with a diaper wash/sanitizer containing sodium percarbonate. Tea stains on cottons and linens can also be removed by soaking in borax and water (1 tbsp borax in 1 c of warm water). Stains on wool and silk or any fabric may be sponged with lukewarm water, then apply glycerine, rubbing lightly between the hands. Let stand for half an hour. Rinse with warm water. If a grease spot remains from cream, sponge with dry cleaning fluid.

Crayons
Treat as for Candle wax. If on wallpaper, after scraping cover with blotting or brown paper, iron with warm iron, shifting paper repeatedly. Final traces may be covered with a paste of cornflour and cleaning fluid. Allow to dry, brush off and repeat if necessary. Go to Crayola’s Stain Removal Tips for helpful hints on removing art material stains from clothes, walls and other tough spots!

Deodorants & Antiperspirants
Sponge dry fabric stain thoroughly with a laundry pre-soak (spot stain remover) and warm water. Rinse. If some stain remains, use a chlorinated laundry bleach or a diaper wash/sanitizer containing sodium percarbonate. Antiperspirants may cause fabric damage and color damage in some dyes. Color may be restored by sponging with ammonia. Dilute ammonia with an equal volume of water for use on wool or silk. Rinse well.

Dyes & Running Colors
These are difficult to remove and no one treatment is successful in all cases. Immediate copious rinsing in tepid water, forcing the water through the stain, is sometimes effective. Washing and sunning will gradually bring results in some cases. Equal parts of methylated spirits (wood alcohol) and ammonia may also succeed. White fabrics may be bleached. Use a chlorinated laundry bleach or a diaper wash/sanitizer containing sodium percarbonate for linens and untreated cottons, hydrogen peroxide for silk, wool and delicate fabrics.

Dye – Setting
Common household salt can be used to “Set Dyes” at a rate of quarter to half a cup per wash tub load. Leave to soak half an hour, rinse, then hang to dry. Salt is a common additive to Laundry Powder formulations. Among its many uses, salt minimizes the risk of “running dyes” when laundering garments.

Egg
Scrape away as much as possible. Sponge with lukewarm water. Never use hot water, as heat hardens the stain. If this does not succeed, spread the stain with a paste of cream of tartar and water, adding a crushed aspirin to the paste. Leave for 20 – 30 minutes. Rinse well in warm water. OR use a diaper wash/sanitizer containing sodium percarbonate.

Fruit Juices & Berries
Fresh stains are easy to remove, but once dry, they are very obstinate. Treat with cool water first and follow up, if necessary, by soaking in a chlorinated laundry bleach or a diaper wash/sanitizer containing sodium percarbonate. Rinse. White cottons and linens may be stretched over a basin and boiling water poured through from a height. Any remaining stain may be removed with chlorinated laundry bleach. Colored fabrics or washable silk, etc., may be soaked in a diaper wash/sanitizer containing sodium percarbonate or a warm borax solution (1 tbsp : 1 c water), or covered with a paste of cream of tartar and warm water. Leave 30 minutes or until stain goes, then rinse well. For persistent stains apply equal quantities of methylated spirits (wood alcohol) and ammonia. Rinse well after treatment. This method is safe for all fabrics, except triacetate (e.g. Tricel). Dilute mixture with an equal quantity of water for fabrics with fugitive dyes. Old stains may be softened in glycerine before treatment. Damp stain, apply glycerine, leave 1 – 2 hours, then add a few drops of vinegar, leave 5 – 10 minutes and rinse well.

Disclaimer: The information and our technical advice – whether verbal or in writing or by way of trials – are given in good faith, but without warranty, and this also applies where proprietary rights of third parties are involved. Our advice does not release you from the obligation to check its validity and to test products as to the suitability for the intended processes and uses.